Figure 4.1: Estimated Deaths and Billion Dollar Losses from Extreme Events in the United States 2004–2013

Figure 4.1: Estimated Deaths and Billion Dollar Losses from Extreme Events in the United States 2004–2013
This figure provides 10-year estimates of fatalities related to extreme events from 2004 to 2013,1 as well as estimated economic damages from 58 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion (see Smith and Katz 2013 to understand how total losses were calculated).2 These statistics are indicative of the human and economic costs of extreme weather events over this time period. Climate change will alter the frequency, intensity, and geographic distribution of some of these extremes,3 which has consequences for exposure to health risks from extreme events. Trends and future projections for some extremes, including tornadoes, lightning, and wind storms are still uncertain.

References

  1. Melillo, J. M., T. (T. C. ) Richmond, and G. W. Yohe, eds., 2014: Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment. U.S. Global Change Research Program, 841 pp. doi:10.7930/J0Z31WJ2 | Detail
  2. NOAA, cited 2010: Weather Fatalities. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. URL | Detail
  3. Smith, A. B., and R. W. Katz, 2013: US billion-dollar weather and climate disasters: Data sources, trends, accuracy and biases. Natural Hazards, 67, 387-410. doi:10.1007/s11069-013-0566-5 | Detail